Nursing Note: Edibles as a delivery system

What Are Edibles?

Edibles are food and drink items that are infused with cannabis. Thanks to the diverse flavors and variety of edible options many patients are starting to explore edibles as a preferred consumption method. Cookies, chocolates, candy, tinctures and cannabis infused drinks provide many ways to deliver the therapeutic effects from cannabis to your body without smoking it.

How Do Edibles Create Their Effect?

The most common edibles are introduced through the gastrointestinal tract (GI tract). Edibles are processed through the liver before entering the bloodstream. The liver changes the cannabinoid THC into a more potent THC form that tends to have a stronger, more sedative effect. The sedative effect from edibles is felt more intensely in your muscles compared to an inhalant.  Since edibles relax your body, this delivery system is popular among those who need to manage symptoms like muscle or joint pain. Depending on your ideal dose, edibles allow for less frequent dosing throughout the day or night since the effects last longer.

How Long Before Edibles Take Effect?

Capsulated edibles, such as Buddha Tears or RSO (Rick Simpson Oil), are introduced through your stomach and tend to take longer to activate within the body (about 30 minutes – 2 hours) but produce a longer-lasting effect (ranging from 6-8 hours).

Verdes Hops Tincture is available at both locations.

Non-capsulated edibles, including tinctures and lozenges have an almost immediate effect but tend to wear off faster (within 2-3 hours). You can increase the onset of effects by placing your candy or tincture under your tongue and holding it there for 30 seconds before swallowing.

Edibles such as chocolate bars and infused drinks are designed to be absorbed in both the mouth and stomach which offer faster acting relief (usually within 30 minutes). Its fast-acting relief is thanks to the THC is being absorbed into your blood stream in two ways: in your mouth as you chew or sip it, then again as it continues into your digestive track.

Remember, when choosing your edible it is very important to understand the potency of the product.  Many are designed to be split into multiple doses, rather than ingesting the entire product at once.

How Can Non-Cannabis Edibles Supplement My Cannabis Therapy?

B-caryophyllene is a terpene found in many Verdes flowers.

There are a variety of foods that have similar properties to cannabis.  Terpenes naturally occur in cannabis, herbs, and fruits. You can supplement your terpene intake by adding certain foods into your wellness regimen. For example, black pepper contains a large amount of the terpene B – caryophyllene which provides significant anti-inflammatory benefits. You can recognize this terpene by its spicy wood scent which gives many cannabis strains a cracked pepper smell.  B – caryophyllene can also be found in rosemary, hops, and cloves.

Additionally, consider adding flax seed to your meals. Flax seed is a super food found to produce compounds similar to CBD that act as anti-oxidants.

Ask our knowledgeable staff about other foods and herbs you can add to your diet to help boost your terpene intake.

Where Do I Find Edibles?

The Verdes Foundation offers a variety edibles to suit a variety of needs and budgets.   During your next visit ask our knowledgeable staff about which option works best to meet your individual needs.  And remember, if you have any questions about the interactions of cannabis and pharmaceuticals; please contact your health care provider or a Verdes Nurse Educator.

Nora, Verdes Nurse Educator